Post bacc vs second degree with low GPA after being sick for years

Forums Premed Discussion General Premed Forum Post bacc vs second degree with low GPA after being sick for years

This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by dartnon October 27, 2018 at 4:18 pm.

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #279340

    lia123
    Participant

    The first 2 years of undergrad I maintained a 3.7 GPA, pro-am athletics, volunteered, clubs, fantastic abroad program, etc.

    I started exhibiting symptoms in 2014 and became chronic in 2015. I received a medical diagnosis in 2017. I underwent reconstructive surgeries and rehabilitation in 2018 and will continue to do so through 2019 with a final surgery at the end of the year. As a result of the last 4 years, my GPA has dropped to 2.31, I have no resume to speak of and I’ve been inconsistent. I’m graduating this spring and I can bring my GPA up to 2.51.

    At this point, I’m wondering whether I should go for a second degree or post bacc considering the last several years. Is there a possibility I would even be accepted into a post bacc considering several have GPA requirements? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    #279352

    dartnon
    Participant

    Sorry to hear about your health issues but glad to hear things are getting better!

    Personally, I think you could take two routes with academics (pros/cons):

    1. Go for a second degree but take more BCPM classes to raise your GPA as well as your Science GPA. Retaking some of the old ones may be helpful as well. Pros are how it can help raise your gpa and average your grades in particular classes. Cons is that you’ll still be doing undergrad work and nothing to show you can handle graduate level work.

    2. Do a PostBacc or apply to a SMP. Anecdotally, I’ve heard of many students that did not perform well in undergrad go into these SMP’s to show that they can handle graduate level course work. Pros are that if you do well, then you increase your chances of entry into medical school and show schools you can handle grad level coursework. A large con is that if you don’t do well–then it’ll be hard to convince medical schools that you are capable of doing well.

    As far as E.C.’s are concerned, I would consider just doing whatever you can handle with volunteering or shadowing–even if it’s as little as one hour per week. I think it’s not only important for applications, but also to determine whether or not you really want to take this route in life.

    Take care and hope this helps!

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.