Skip to content

Reader Profile: EK

THE FOLLOWING ARE QUESTIONS FOR A NEW SERIES OF POSTS ENTITLED “READER PROFILES.” EACH POST IN THIS SERIES WILL DETAIL THE CURRENT SITUATIONS AND CHALLENGES OF A MEDICAL SCHOOL HQ READER. THE PURPOSE OF THIS SERIES IS TO HELP US ALL IDENTIFY WITH PEOPLE LIKE US (IN SIMILAR SITUATIONS — NOT ALL WILL BE, OF COURSE, BUT EVENTUALLY I’M SURE YOU WILL FIND SOMEONE LIKE YOU HERE), GET TO KNOW THE FREQUENT COMMENTERS ON THE SITE, AND HEAR SOME WISDOM/CHALLENGES FROM PEOPLE OTHER THAN THE SITE CREATORS. I BELIEVE THIS SERIES IS A GREAT ALTERNATIVE TO THOSE THAT DON’T ENJOY DIGGING AROUND FORUMS FOR INFORMATION ABOUT SITUATIONS THAT THEY MAY BE CURRENTLY PLAGUED WITH. USE THE BELOW QUESTIONS AS THE OUTLINE. YOU CAN EXPAND EACH ANSWER BEYOND THE DEFAULT QUESTIONS I HAVE ENTERED. ADD ANYTHING YOU FEEL WILL BE HELPFUL TO THOSE AT THE START OF THEIR JOURNEY.

If you’re interested in contributing to this series, then drop me an email. The series can be a very valuable source for readers and I need a steady stream of new ones to keep it going.

Next in the series is MedicalSchoolHQ reader EK. He answered my questions (in red below) as follows:

Please tell us a bit about yourself (include where you are in your path to becoming a physician).

I began taking post bacc classes in May of 2011. I applied beginning in late June of this year, I had several interviews, but so far, I am going to MSU-COM. There are a couple of schools I might like to go to that I haven’t heard from yet. I am glad just to have someone. I have a bachelors and master’s degree in music education.

Describe your path to medical school (MCAT scores, undergrad GPA with emphasis on any difficulties in required courses, D.O. vs M.D. and why, and if you are further along in your training any other information you think would be helpful to others – i.e. AMCAS process tips, interview tips).

I began my undergrad in Music education in 1996, and finished in 2001 with a degree in music education. I taught for 5 years in Michigan, then after being downsized, did my master’s degree in Music education at Kent State. I graduated in 2008, and have taught each year since. I have always had excellent grades, but my wife and I had some extensive medical issues that reignited my desire to be a doctor. I prefer D.O., but did apply to a couple of M.D. schools just because of proximity. I think my biggest barrier to acceptance was having virtually no sciences classes from undergrad etc. and being a rural area without a major university close. I’d be glad to discuss my AMCAS experience, but if I were you I wouldn’t do it like me!

What were(are) the biggest obstacles to your path to an acceptance letter?

see above.

What have you encountered that you wish you could go back and tell your younger self?

I wish I could tell myself to do this when I was already downsized and relocating and didn’t have children, I’d be way farther ahead!

What are your plans for the future (medical school goals, residency goals, practice types)?

1) become a doctor 2) help sick people. Seriously, I hope to get through medical school and become a doctor – probably family physician, OB/GYN, pediatrician and just live my life!

What is(are) your best piece(s) of advice for others on their path to medical school?

Ask for help. Ask for help from profs, friends, family. It is best not done alone, and people want to help, usually, and also, write thank you notes!

This doesn’t fall into the questions above:

Shortly after my wife and I married, my wife lost a pregnancy. As I was being downsized, My wife was diagnosed with several genetic blood clotting conditions. We ended up doing IVF while in graduate school. We have 3 children ages 5(twins) and 2, and 4 angels, as my wife says. At the same time, I was diagnosed with acute pernicious anemia, which is now controlled with supplements. It is this process that led to my deciding that medicine is where I need to be. Also during this time, our university apartment flooded with sewage and we lost nearly all of our belongings. I began classes in 2011, and completed 65 quarter credits in 15 months, while working 2 jobs, and receiving nearly a 4.0 (My first chemistry class in 17 years, I got a B+, shucks).

Again if you’re interested in contributing to this series, then drop me an email.

If you feel like the information in this post is useful, please share it. I would also love to hear your comments below.

The Premed Years SubscribeOur New Podcast!

If you haven’t had a chance yet to see our new “online radio show” – The Premed Years, go check it out now! It’s available in iTunes (or the Podcasts app on iOS), Stitcher Radio, Zune and Blackberry.

Our weekly podcast will bring you the best content and information available to help you get into medical school, residency and beyond. Take us to the gym. Listen to us while you drive. Run with us outside. Where ever you may listen to The Premed Years, we thank  you for taking the time to listen to what we have to say! We have interviews with Deans of Medical School scheduled, popular premed/med student forum owners and more to bring you in the near future!

Leave us a Review and Rating!

Just like Yelp reviews or IMDB ratings help you choose your next restaurant or movie, leaving a 5 star rating and/or a written review is very valuable to The Premed Years. It allows us to be able to share our information with more people than ever before.

I am so incredibly thankful to those who have recently gone into our listing in iTunes to provide a five start rating and a written review of The Premed Years.

SEARCH SITE

paperbackfront_245x245

DOWNLOAD FREE

Crush the MCAT with our
MCAT Secrets eBook

RECENT POSTS

paperbackfront_245x245

DOWNLOAD FREE - Crush the MCAT with our MCAT Secrets eBook

2 Shares
Share
Tweet
Pin
Share